Thursday, 29 October 2020

www.doverforum.com/sea-news
Sea Pictures from Dover

See the OPEN LETTER from Port of Dover CEO Doug Bannister just below....

For Safety Sake : Not a sea to cross in a small boat......


Rough Day Dover : The Lighthouse on Admiralty Pier.



The Disney Magic setting off on a Channel run in the recent gloom....

The Disney Magic

Moving the Disney Magic away from the new pier above just as night falls
...storm on its way...moving her to settle more securely on the eastern arm Port of Dover.

The Disney Wonder

Another picture above of the Disney Wonder departing Dover... since this pic was taken the Disney Magic has returned.


Big menacing sky at Dover above but the sea was still tranquil...for that moment anyway, but it didnt last.....


The Disney Wonder departs Dover...


The Disney Wonder:

We had the magnificent Disney Magic with us here in the Port of Dover for such a long time until she left a few weeks ago....but now as if by wondrous magic, up pops another Disney,
The Disney Wonder...and you can see her pictured above there. Also in shot...survey boat Diana.


OPEN LETTER FROM DOUG BANNISTER, CEO, PORT OF DOVER




Dover is the right choice for business and consumers now more than ever



The United Kingdom Major Ports Group (‘UKMPG’) has issued a ‘briefing paper’ intended to encourage businesses to transfer cargo away from the Short Straits, the UK’s most vital link to European markets.

The paper points out that the Short Straits, which includes ferry links between Dover and Calais, as well as the Channel Tunnel, has a 60% market share of ‘British-Continental EU trade’. The Short Straits has achieved this market share because it is the right choice for business. Indeed, the paper acknowledges that the routes businesses use today are the right ones and the reason businesses choose the Short Straits is simple; it offers the most time efficient, cost effective and resilient access to international markets, delivering an estimated £3 billion saving for British businesses and consumers compared to alternative routes.

Our own independent analysis (Oxera 2018) has previously suggested that it would cost around £2.7 billion to take just 20% of our existing traffic in order to pay for new ferries operating on longer and slower routes. Importantly, these new ferries do not exist today and need to be built. With shipyard capacities and construction lead times, delivering such a fleet of new ferries holds significant lead time.

The UKMPG paper suggests that other ports might have capacity to take up to 60% of Short Straits traffic now, but acknowledges that this requires both Government and trader support for this offer of ‘resilience’ to be possible. Exponentially, this suggests that the cost to businesses and ultimately the consumer could be up to around £8 billion.

For Port of Dover, when looking at the overall UK Trade Resilience we take a systemic view – across ports, vessels, capacities, frequencies, operating models and traffic management schemes. To focus only on port capacity is terribly one-dimensional.

The geographic advantage that Port of Dover holds with the UK’s largest trading partner means that a single vessel can complete up to five round voyages in a single day, making our ferries hugely productive assets. Further, our operating model delivers an average inbound dwell time at our port of just five minutes, providing unparalleled port efficiency.

Other operating models, for example containers and unaccompanied trailers may have inbound dwell times from several hours to even several days, adding inefficiency to the system-wide supply chains. For those routes with longer sea voyages, a single vessel may only make a single round voyage in a day – meaning to replicate the capacities and frequencies offered via Port of Dover would require five times as many vessels.


The UKMPG paper admits that a ‘short term’ constraint might be the availability of additional ferries to handle the trucks being encouraged to divert to other routes, whilst also citing wider capacity issues on the southern North Sea corridor.

The report is right to focus on resilience as we approach the end of the Transition Period, but what resilience do you have if you are sending traffic to ports where the ferries do not exist? Neither is that a quick fix. The market dynamic is important here. In fact, rather than investing in new ferries, operators at some of the alternative ports have actually been closing these longer routes with tonnage moving back to the short routes as that is what the market wants – Dover has of course kept going throughout the pandemic. This dynamic applies to the European side too, with the majority of freight vehicles choosing to route through northern France to Calais and Dunkirk as it is simply closest.

All EU-facing UK ports will be under the same rules – there will be a standard process and transaction applied everywhere. We know from examples elsewhere, such as ‘Operation Wellington’ on the Humber, which anticipates using parts of the M62 and M180 as holding areas for HGVs, that if there is disruption it will be everywhere. The report itself admits that there is already a risk of disruption at these alternative ports due to new systems for HGVs. Therefore, on top of this, sending more traffic to ports that do not even have the ferry capacity will make the situation far worse and create far less resilience for UK trade.

In contrast, the traffic management regimes for the Short Straits are tested and proven – in short, we know they work. For example, the recent national security operation that affected all ports with additional screening and searches left around 4,500 lorries in Operation Stack. When the security operation ended, Dover had cleared all queuing traffic and was back to normal operations within just 12 hours. Nowhere else could do that. It would take weeks with the current vessel capacities and frequencies available elsewhere. For UK trade resilience, supply chains must have the confidence in managing periods of disruption, and crucially recovery and restoration of normal flows as swiftly as possible – both areas in which Port of Dover has excellent credentials.

As we all navigate the massive economic difficulties caused by COVID, and the uncertainties as we approach the End of Transition, it is right to showcase the incredible efforts of the maritime sector, and the excellent ports that we have across the nation towards ensuring supply chains are robust and functioning well.


Come what may, we will keep working to keep the nation supplied with the essential goods people need at this difficult time and give all businesses wherever they are the benefits of Dover’s unrivalled service. This is what we do all day, every day.

Indeed, as the Maritime Minister said on a panel discussion with us only the other day regarding the national trade network; ‘you have to have goods and people moving around freely. So if you are to have parts moving quickly and efficiently across the Channel, and through Dover, and through the country, you have a much easier opportunity for companies that might exist in the Midlands or in the North to get involved in whatever that industry is.’


The report says that the UK has not always been reliant on the Short Straits, harking back to pre-Single Market days. Equally, the UK has not always been reliant on the internet and same day/next day/just-in-time deliveries, but it is now.

A vision that takes the UK backwards is not the vision of the future we want to see. We need one that backs consumers and businesses everywhere for the challenges and opportunities ahead of us. We feel that we should celebrate our impressive, modern and efficient supply chains across all ports and modes throughout the nation.

For Dover, we fully appreciate the essential role that we conduct for the nation, and will continue to take our responsibility with all of the due care and attention the British people would expect of us, which is why Dover will remain the clear market choice.


Doug Bannister, CEO Port of Dover.


ENDS

ITALIA STREAM

Italia Stream...regular reefer... seen here approaching the Port of Dover.



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Post 157
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
The Pride of Burgundy was out of action for just a short time, see the earlier posts, her time away was minimal and amounted to no more than 3 days or so. Whatever the damage was..well it must have been small by nature for sure, as she was fixed and back in the fray in short shrift. Here she is in action over the weekend with a full compliment on board. P & O are currently offering a deal with free wine ( always good!! ). We will try to find out more.

Below we have the French Coast looming large. Visibility was very good in the unusually pleasant weather.

* *
The cargo aspect to the harbour activity seems to increase day by day. We nowadays have an ongoing and steady stream of cargo vessels many with the prefix Star to the name. This one is the Star Standard and here she is arriving on saturday with a full load. They unloaded her into the night for quick turnaround with the slot urgently needed for the next scheduled arrival. It is decidedly all busy busy at the cargo terminal.



Monday, 7 October 2013 - 07:56
 
Post 156
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Here we are with a picture of the much loved Astrid moored in Dover Harbour in high summer this year. See the previous two posts below and you can follow up the links for further news. This lovely sailing ship sank off Kinsale not long after leaving us here in Dover. The crew of 30, mostly youngsters, all got off safely thanks to the efforts of the local RNLI and assorted local vessels, salvagers etc, who took part in the rescue.

The Astrid sailing ship in Dover Harbour 2013.


Saturday, 5 October 2013 - 15:59
 
Post 155
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Great stuff at spotting that Tom, interesting bit of news indeed. I thought for a moment the news would totally cheer us all up seeing as they have brought her to the surface..but ..there is always a but, the salvage guys doubt if she will be restored to her old self. All to do with cost. But you never know. Depends on how deep the chequebooks are.

Interesting radio piece. Definitely worth a listen.

Well done Tom Smiley
Will fetch out a pic or two in due course.
EXTRA: just to add for those who dont know..this beautiful sailing ship sank off Cork in rough weather a week after being with us here in Dover.

Saturday, 5 October 2013 - 15:23
 
Post 154
  Tom Austin, London, bright and coo
Tall ship Astrid hauled up from the sea...

Radio report...

www.rte.ie/news/player/2013/0910/20434786-tall-ship-astrid-hauled-up-from-the-sea/

Story and pictures...

www.thejournal.ie/astrid-kinsale-1076990-Sep2013/

Saturday, 5 October 2013 - 12:23
 
Post 153
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)

Mid morning friday and its Dover Harbour under a big sky...the Spirit of Britain on the left is about to reverse to Pier 9 while the Braemar sits comfortably over on the right hand side at the cruise terminal. I dont know the reason why but this time of year the sky takes on a whole new aura..its as if it gets bigger or deeper or... Dover is a great place to see these big skies and we still have the odd cruise ship trickling through as well, not to mention the ever flowing ferries. So there is always a spectacle of some sort on show.

Below its later in the day, earlier the wind had been blowing up a bit but had settled down for the departure of the Braemar around 5pm. She is just outside the harbour here and turning south heading for Nantes in France. Unusual destination. Yours truly has never seen Nantes, wonder what its like?
(Ponders wistfully while gazing into the mid distance..)


Yes indeed you may well be right about virus Howard. But have you ever wondered what happened to plain old seasickness...it just isnt on trend anymore. The troubled Black Watch headed out into the storm the other night..see the Armageddon thread in the Forum.. and jeez it was rough out there. It was rough on land never mind out on the ocean wave, so seasickness must play a part. But of course the headline writers on the 24 hour news channels will prefer to call it an...'outbreak'. Makes a better headline I suppose than saying simply.. 10 people seasick on the...



Saturday, 5 October 2013 - 06:44
 
Post 152
  howard mcsweeney, dover
definitely a virus paul, i used to suffer from sea sickness many years ago and as soon as i stepped onto dry land it passed.

i remember the irish sea crossings and just as bad was the harwich/hook version.

Friday, 4 October 2013 - 11:57
 
Post 151
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
As promised here we are with more images of the unfortunate Black Watch. Its reputation for sickness follows it around like a dark cloud and they cant seem to shake the image off. Here she is arriving at 12.15 yesterday.

Below we have more pictures of her but this time later in the day as she nestled at the terminal. This time with Syros in attendance. Syros is a small oil tanker..no doubt shown here in the process of re-fuelling the Black Watch. The sky above didnt look too promising for the resumption of voyage.

and below another one of the same but of course zoomed in.

I sometimes wonder if nowadays we have a very sanitised notion of travelling at sea. The exotic and large cruise liners seem to conjure up this impression of bullet-proof immunity. In reality I wonder if a lot of these so called 'outbreaks' are simply just plain seasickness. Even today people must suffer from it. Even Admiral Nelson himself suffered with the problem.

Back 40 years ago or more, when travelling across the rough ol Irish Sea, almost a third of the ship would be seasick. The shipping lines didnt bother too much with stabilisers and the like in those days, and of course the passengers paid the cost in more ways than one. But back then we didnt have a fancy name for it ( Norovirus ) we were just plain...sick!..with the often very extreme motion of the sea.

I wouldnt for a moment underplay any illness outbreak but it makes you wonder.

The Black Watch came yesterday and I think it was its first visit in a year or so. In today is another ship from the same Fred Olsen line...the much more regular and familiar Braemar. Conditions are not terribly good today out there so I hope all well. The Braemar has surpassed the 1.5 millionth customer mark, we had a feature on it recently if you scroll back, no doubt now working on the next milestone.. the 2 millionth !

Friday, 4 October 2013 - 08:03
 
Post 150
  howard mcsweeney, dover
indeed the usual reason due to leave about now.

Thursday, 3 October 2013 - 17:54
 
Post 149
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn,com)
The Black Watch finally made it into harbour at 12.15pm..just a while after midday...just a few minutes ago in fact as I write.
The controversially prone ship appeared to be running late as few arrive this time of day.
Is there a further sickness emergency onboard?


Will aim for more pictures in due course..just popped those up to be going on with.

Thursday, 3 October 2013 - 12:44
 
Post 148
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Yes thats good news about the Aida ships coming right up until Christmas, will be great to see them..although I'm thinking that a stout breast and a sturdy gait would be needed out there on the ocean waves at that time of the year. Solid oak legs and a head without inner ear difficulties would help too.
Smiley

The Black Watch was due in today but nothing so far.

But here we go with the latest pix. This time trying to keep up with the busy cargo terminal which has increased traffic quite considerably over the years. As Kevin said previously..up to 26% of the nations bananas come in through Dover. Excellent. The following pictures were taken a day or two ago...so..
here we go with the Southern Bay arriving under a menacing sky.. from Rotterdam if I am remembering correctly.
and closer in for more detail.

Will keep an eye out for any further developments today re Black Watch. As mentioned above she was due in today but nothing so far.
The ship has been hit by further Norovirus problems.
also
I note today that The Pride of Burgundy is back in action. Smiley

Thursday, 3 October 2013 - 07:52
 
Post 147
  JanT, Dover
Nice to hear we have not quite seen the last of the Cruise Ships for this year,some winter pictures in store.
And i'm sure there are many who enjoy winter cruising as well as summer.Smiley


Wednesday, 2 October 2013 - 21:49
 
Post 146
  ColetteB, Dover
Great stuff on this Doverforum Sea News, certainly keeps us all entertained with the fabulous photos & interesting information aplenty, well done guys Smiley

PaulB, we haven't yet seen the last of the Aida's this season, according to my schedule the AIDAsol arrives here just before Christmas, on December 23rd in fact. She was last here in April 2011 so at worst we might have snow but at best who knows, it might just be a very nice clear winterly day Smiley

Wednesday, 2 October 2013 - 16:26
 
Post 145
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Thanks to River for the comments..positive comments and contributions welcome,
yes we are flagging up the positives about Dover on this new page and there are many positives to enjoy.
The ship above is the Aida Mar which visited Dover yesterday. The picture was taken mid afternoon while she nestled at the pier. She is of course a German cruise ship and there are a whole string of Aida's as we know, and they keep right on bringing visitors here to Dover and very welcome they are too. Unfortunately it is a bit difficult getting pictures of the ships arriving or leaving at this time of the year, alas alas, as they arrive in the dark and leave in the dark. Oh the rigours...Smiley
This picture immediately above therefore is from a little while back and shows her arriving and gliding across the harbour on a very bright morning and in very close order. Such an array of colour first thing in the morning can be quite a shock so it can.. especially if you have a wee hangover.. lol!

And now the harbour or port as mentioned by the commentator from River,
here is an extra one of the sun rising across the harbour in splendid style. Picture taken just 2 days ago.
No navigation equipment needed for Calais..the captain of the Spirit just says to crew..'just follow the sun boys!' Smiley

I have thrown in a little bit of my roof there.

Wednesday, 2 October 2013 - 07:37
 
Post 144
   , River, Dover
Thank you for showing some great photos not only of the ships that use the port but the port of Dover its self.Smiley

Tuesday, 1 October 2013 - 09:49
 
Post 143
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Thanks to Mike and Howard there for the information and comments.
Just to let all know that the colourful Aida Mar is in today. Quite a large ship for the time of year. Will try to get a picture or two later. She came in while it was still dark. The Empress failed to show yesterday..she was on the schedule..but

The news reached us yesterday that the dear old Pride of Burgundy had suffered a hole in her undercarriage and has now been withdrawn from service. Its not surprising, as these ships take quite a battering day in and day out. This prompted me to look back through the archives and I came up with these from way back in 2007 can you believe.

This first picture below is by none other than PHIL MEDGETT.
Phil sent this to me way back in 2007. I cant swear to it being the Burgundy but it looks like it. Phil braved the Prince of Wales pier in a storm that year. Brave man. It shows the 'Burgundy' across the breakwater with the sea powering over..

This is the Burgundy below for sure and also from 2007. Getting quite a pounding as you can see. The quality of these two pictures isnt great but my equipment is better nowadays. A chap needs his equipment. But at least they show what its like for the Burgundy crossing in rough weather.

No doubt we will see her back in frontline service real soon.

also one more of the Albatross to add to the mix. Taken on arrival on Sunday and lit by an early sun.


Tuesday, 1 October 2013 - 07:31
 
Post 142
  howard mcsweeney, dover
thanks for info about the "mair" mike, great photos from paul there especially the sunrise ones.

we get great dawn and sunset shots in dover but telephone lines get in the way of mine.

Monday, 30 September 2013 - 18:44
 
Post 141
  Mike J., Dover
ALBATROS - nice pix of a nice ship.

Portland - big former naval port on the east side of Portland Bill, just south of Weymouth.

Site of last year's Olympic sailing events.


By the way, the neat little MAIR, photographed by Paul S & posted by Howard is an ex-RN 'Clovelly' Class Fleet Tender built in 1973 as the HORNING for odd jobs in support of the Navy.
Since she 'went civilian' she has often been chartered by Trinity House for work on navigational aids.

Monday, 30 September 2013 - 08:03
 
Post 140
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
It is just past 8pm on a very dark Sunday night and the Albatross has just left in a blaze of sparkling dazzling light..at the moment the ship is just outside harbour and turning south, heading for Portland.. not really sure where Portland is but thats what it says on the tin. Its a dark oul night for sure...I wouldnt be convinced its an ideal time of year for cruising but many like it. The weather is calm though which I suppose is appreciated by those sipping cocktails with the captain !Smiley

But here we are..pictures from the other end of the spectrum...its arrival earlier today just after sunrise.

And below a little while later across the harbour being manouvred into position by Doughty and Dauntless.

and once again, slipping slowly slowly into place on a gorgeous bright morning.




Sunday, 29 September 2013 - 20:18
 
Post 139
  PaulB, Dover
The Albatross is in harbour now and looking sleek. No pictures yet because yours truly was sidetracked and wholly fascinated by the early sun hanging over the harbour as The Albatross approached. I havent uploaded the Albatross pictures from the camera as of yet so bear with me. It is her final call this year as you might expect.

But here we are with pictures of the early sun over the harbour which I thought were worth putting up on the page. It rises amid tramtracks of jet streams. Only a day or so ago I noticed the entire cloud formulation over the harbour was made up entirely of jet streams. If thats not one for the global warming bods i dont know. But anyway here we are with the latest batch of jet streams as of the sunrise this very morning. Will do the ship itself in due course so bear with..as they say.



John and Jan see also the post below.
Will have pictures of the Albatross later.

Sunday, 29 September 2013 - 08:26
 
Post 138
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Ah..of course. Thanks for the information there John..the Quest for Adventure of course. How could I forget. Just looking at the picture i expected it to be called Saga something or other and the name completely slipped my mind. Interesting info too about the Saga Ruby and yes indeed she had a great send off from Dover.

Yes thats right Jan thousands and thousands will have enjoyed her pleasures. I wonder how many people have actually travelled on the ship over the years. When you think that only recently the Fred Olsen Braemar celebrated its 1.5millionth customer..I feel sure the Saga Ruby must be way up there too. The story on the Braemar is now on page 5 right here on Sea News.

THE ALBATROSS is approaching. Pictures in due course.

Sunday, 29 September 2013 - 06:48
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