Thursday, 29 October 2020

www.doverforum.com/sea-news
Sea Pictures from Dover

See the OPEN LETTER from Port of Dover CEO Doug Bannister just below....

For Safety Sake : Not a sea to cross in a small boat......


Lighthouse on Admiralty Pier, rough day Dover.



The Disney Magic setting off on a Channel run in the recent gloom....

The Disney Magic

Moving the Disney Magic away from the new pier above just as night falls
...storm on its way...moving her to settle more securely on the eastern arm Port of Dover.

The Disney Wonder

Another picture above of the Disney Wonder departing Dover... since this pic was taken the Disney Magic has returned.


Big menacing sky at Dover above but the sea was still tranquil...for that moment anyway, but it didnt last.....


The Disney Wonder departs Dover...


The Disney Wonder:

We had the magnificent Disney Magic with us here in the Port of Dover for such a long time until she left a few weeks ago....but now as if by wondrous magic, up pops another Disney,
The Disney Wonder...and you can see her pictured above there. Also in shot...survey boat Diana.


OPEN LETTER FROM DOUG BANNISTER, CEO, PORT OF DOVER




Dover is the right choice for business and consumers now more than ever



The United Kingdom Major Ports Group (‘UKMPG’) has issued a ‘briefing paper’ intended to encourage businesses to transfer cargo away from the Short Straits, the UK’s most vital link to European markets.

The paper points out that the Short Straits, which includes ferry links between Dover and Calais, as well as the Channel Tunnel, has a 60% market share of ‘British-Continental EU trade’. The Short Straits has achieved this market share because it is the right choice for business. Indeed, the paper acknowledges that the routes businesses use today are the right ones and the reason businesses choose the Short Straits is simple; it offers the most time efficient, cost effective and resilient access to international markets, delivering an estimated £3 billion saving for British businesses and consumers compared to alternative routes.

Our own independent analysis (Oxera 2018) has previously suggested that it would cost around £2.7 billion to take just 20% of our existing traffic in order to pay for new ferries operating on longer and slower routes. Importantly, these new ferries do not exist today and need to be built. With shipyard capacities and construction lead times, delivering such a fleet of new ferries holds significant lead time.

The UKMPG paper suggests that other ports might have capacity to take up to 60% of Short Straits traffic now, but acknowledges that this requires both Government and trader support for this offer of ‘resilience’ to be possible. Exponentially, this suggests that the cost to businesses and ultimately the consumer could be up to around £8 billion.

For Port of Dover, when looking at the overall UK Trade Resilience we take a systemic view – across ports, vessels, capacities, frequencies, operating models and traffic management schemes. To focus only on port capacity is terribly one-dimensional.

The geographic advantage that Port of Dover holds with the UK’s largest trading partner means that a single vessel can complete up to five round voyages in a single day, making our ferries hugely productive assets. Further, our operating model delivers an average inbound dwell time at our port of just five minutes, providing unparalleled port efficiency.

Other operating models, for example containers and unaccompanied trailers may have inbound dwell times from several hours to even several days, adding inefficiency to the system-wide supply chains. For those routes with longer sea voyages, a single vessel may only make a single round voyage in a day – meaning to replicate the capacities and frequencies offered via Port of Dover would require five times as many vessels.


The UKMPG paper admits that a ‘short term’ constraint might be the availability of additional ferries to handle the trucks being encouraged to divert to other routes, whilst also citing wider capacity issues on the southern North Sea corridor.

The report is right to focus on resilience as we approach the end of the Transition Period, but what resilience do you have if you are sending traffic to ports where the ferries do not exist? Neither is that a quick fix. The market dynamic is important here. In fact, rather than investing in new ferries, operators at some of the alternative ports have actually been closing these longer routes with tonnage moving back to the short routes as that is what the market wants – Dover has of course kept going throughout the pandemic. This dynamic applies to the European side too, with the majority of freight vehicles choosing to route through northern France to Calais and Dunkirk as it is simply closest.

All EU-facing UK ports will be under the same rules – there will be a standard process and transaction applied everywhere. We know from examples elsewhere, such as ‘Operation Wellington’ on the Humber, which anticipates using parts of the M62 and M180 as holding areas for HGVs, that if there is disruption it will be everywhere. The report itself admits that there is already a risk of disruption at these alternative ports due to new systems for HGVs. Therefore, on top of this, sending more traffic to ports that do not even have the ferry capacity will make the situation far worse and create far less resilience for UK trade.

In contrast, the traffic management regimes for the Short Straits are tested and proven – in short, we know they work. For example, the recent national security operation that affected all ports with additional screening and searches left around 4,500 lorries in Operation Stack. When the security operation ended, Dover had cleared all queuing traffic and was back to normal operations within just 12 hours. Nowhere else could do that. It would take weeks with the current vessel capacities and frequencies available elsewhere. For UK trade resilience, supply chains must have the confidence in managing periods of disruption, and crucially recovery and restoration of normal flows as swiftly as possible – both areas in which Port of Dover has excellent credentials.

As we all navigate the massive economic difficulties caused by COVID, and the uncertainties as we approach the End of Transition, it is right to showcase the incredible efforts of the maritime sector, and the excellent ports that we have across the nation towards ensuring supply chains are robust and functioning well.


Come what may, we will keep working to keep the nation supplied with the essential goods people need at this difficult time and give all businesses wherever they are the benefits of Dover’s unrivalled service. This is what we do all day, every day.

Indeed, as the Maritime Minister said on a panel discussion with us only the other day regarding the national trade network; ‘you have to have goods and people moving around freely. So if you are to have parts moving quickly and efficiently across the Channel, and through Dover, and through the country, you have a much easier opportunity for companies that might exist in the Midlands or in the North to get involved in whatever that industry is.’


The report says that the UK has not always been reliant on the Short Straits, harking back to pre-Single Market days. Equally, the UK has not always been reliant on the internet and same day/next day/just-in-time deliveries, but it is now.

A vision that takes the UK backwards is not the vision of the future we want to see. We need one that backs consumers and businesses everywhere for the challenges and opportunities ahead of us. We feel that we should celebrate our impressive, modern and efficient supply chains across all ports and modes throughout the nation.

For Dover, we fully appreciate the essential role that we conduct for the nation, and will continue to take our responsibility with all of the due care and attention the British people would expect of us, which is why Dover will remain the clear market choice.


Doug Bannister, CEO Port of Dover.


ENDS

ITALIA STREAM

Italia Stream...regular reefer... seen here approaching the Port of Dover.



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Your Comments (Newest First):
 
Post 137
  JanT, Dover
some really fab pictures of the Saga Ruby leaving dover for the last time, the end of an era for the ship.
I'm sure there will be some happy memories for all of those people who have sailed on her.Smiley

Saturday, 28 September 2013 - 14:45
 
Post 136
  John Mavin, Dover
That's the Ruby (the Rose finally bowed out in 2009) and the Quest for Adventure. I can't tell you the actual date because I've lost my diary for 2011. With an eight year difference in their ages the interior layouts of the Rose and the Ruby was significantly different.

On Thursday I visited both the Ruby and the Sapphire and inevitably the subject of the Ruby's future was discussed. Needless to say plenty of rumours are flying around but for obvious commercial reasons nothing will be disclosed until the ink is dry on a contract. However, there is a strong hope that Ruby will continue her life, but not necessarily as a seagoing ship (on that bombshell ......!).

Saga Ruby was given a very nice send-off from Dover and one particularly amusing feature was a dance routine performed by the tugs prior to hitching up. Still pictures wouldn't really capture it, but if anyone videoed that from a distance you'd see what I mean.

Saturday, 28 September 2013 - 10:39
 
Post 135
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
By way of further homage to the dear departed Saga Ruby.
Here is a picture from a couple of years back which I had labelled 'Saga Ships' in the archive. The ship on the left looks like the Saga Ruby or could it be the Saga Rose..they were near identical as far as i could make out, The ship on the right is not Saga at all but the Ryndam from the Holland America Line. But for the life of me I cant remember now what the one in the middle is? Year is 2011. Picture was taken immediately after one of those summer storms, hence the soft light.


To mark the final departure I couldnt resist doing a mock-up as homage to the passing era. As the ship looks mightily from another time, even a tad Art Deco, I figured we could almost get back into that era by creating this (fake) postcard immediately below, just the way they used to make the postcards of old. And as she leaves and the band plays on, you can almost see Jay Gatsby nuzzling into those Pink Gins on the foredeck. Picture was of course taken thursday evening.


And speaking also of the near identical Saga Rose now no longer with us either. Here is another couple of old pictures from about six or seven years back. This time featuring the interior of the Saga Rose. These pictures were sent to me several years ago by Barry W-S. Ive never been on one of these Sagas myself but here we go. I imagine it was exactly the same on the Saga Ruby.



That's the oul dependable David Church below there through the mist Howard.
Well done as ever Paul Sampson - keep them coming as and when.


Saturday, 28 September 2013 - 06:47
 
Post 134
  howard mcsweeney, Dover
this has probably featured on this thread before but i cannot work out what exactly it is and does, no doubt ed or mike will know the answer.




Friday, 27 September 2013 - 15:40
 
Post 133
  howard mcsweeney, Dover
another taken by paul s yesterday, the "mair" which is a buoy/lighthouse maintenance vessel.





Friday, 27 September 2013 - 10:26
 
Post 132
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
A great set of pictures all round there guys. Well done with those. Great stuff.
Yes indeed Dover gave the Saga Ruby a terrific send off. It was a mite sad to see her go, with the horns sounding and the water spraying. But age catches up with us all in the end I suppose. She really had that old world different era look to her..but now gone.

It was a spectacular goodbye though for sure..here are a few pix from me to add to the collection.
One of the tugs spraying in her path as she begins to move away out of shot.
The second tug doing the business as the Saga Ruby reaches open water..I didn't get a pic of the two spraying together unfortunately.
She begins to turn for Funchal with the pilot in attendance and one of the tugs returning. The send off complete.



Friday, 27 September 2013 - 07:03
 
Post 131
  Mike J., Dover
Ed -

Re the DAVID CHURCH - the answer to my query might be in DHB Notice to Mariners 34/12 which mentions shoaling & changes to currents in the vicinity of the blockship.

It's not possible to put up 'live links' here & even a partial one would take up two lines of text so it's probably better to go to the DHB website home page, then in turn -

MORE
GENERAL MARINE INSTRUCTIONS
NOTICES TO MARINERS

Thanks for the Interesting photo of the contractors on the Breakwater, first time that I've seen vehicles out there.
Never imagined the DAVID CHURCH as a vehicle ferry !





Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 23:29
 
Post 130
  Kevin Charles, Dover
Fitting send off from the Port of Dover tugs to a loyal cruise customer. Here's hoping Saga have plans for some new tonnage to grace Dover, in addition to the Saga Sapphire and Saga Pearl II

Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 20:15
 
Post 129
  Dovert, Dover
...and another



Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 20:06
 
Post 128
  howard mcsweeney, Dover
many thanks to paul sampson of w.c.c.p for sending these in, taken late afternoon from st martin's battery.

a fitting farewell to the "saga ruby".




Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 20:03
 
Post 127
  JanT, Dover
Yes good luck to the new team at DHB, hopefully they will continue to keep Sea News updated as before, always good to hear of any projects they have in the pipeline.SmileySmiley

Some nice pictures guys always sad to see the end of the cruise ship season,but we have been treated to a fab array of pictures of the ones that have graced our seafront this season.SmileySmiley

Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 17:54
 
Post 126
  Ed Connell, Dover
Mike: Re the David Church dredging over the remains of the Spanish Prince. Don't know if there is still any build up of silt as there used to be when the blockship was still present. However, presume the area still has to be dredged in the same way as the rest of the harbour. David Church was over at the Knuckle Light yesterday landing her grab on the breakwater, and can also see a dumper truck in the photo. Very misty accounting for poor quality.



Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 15:54
 
Post 125
  Ed Connell, Dover
Dunkerque Seaways conducting the annual exchange of one of her MES (Marine Evacuation System) units during the weekly layover in Dunkerque West on Saturday night.



Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 15:44
 
Post 124
  Ed Connell, Dover
Another view of the Messina Strait at the Dover Cargo Terminal a couple of days ago, with Lyrika still on the Eastern Arm and listed as dead ship awaiting spares.



Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 15:38
 
Post 123
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Gosh you did very well getting that picture from the heights Howard. It looks great. I saw the Carnival Legend leaving last evening but could only see it faintly in shadowy outline sort of thing. She slipped away quietly in the foggy gloom and is sadly gone now and maybe for good...which is a bit of a pity. Thanks for all the very useful info Kevin. Yes saw the dredger Mike...Ed might know the answer to that one when he comes on. I think we did have discussion previously about the blockship effect heralding a change in the tidal situation.

And now as promised here we are with pictures of the new team at DHB. Clare Newman has departed as we saw in my previous post below.
Barbara Buczek on the left is now Head of Business and Corporate Affairs and Ben Greenwood on the right takes over as Business Development Manager, replacing Clare Newman, and will report to Barbara...there is more fuller info in my previous post below from yesterday if you scroll down..
SmileyGood luck to the new team.

I cant let the departure of the super Carnival Legend go by without a picture from yours truly. So in the best tradition of those TV pundits of yore..
...here's one I made earlier.


The Saga Ruby is in harbour for the final time as i write with the other Saga (Saga Sapphire) approaching. Visibilty still not great yet but not as bad as yesterday..it might improve.


Thursday, 26 September 2013 - 07:10
 
Post 122
  Mike J., Dover
Does anyone know why the DHB dredger DAVID CHURCH has been spending a lot of time in the last month or so working near the blockship by the Western Enntrance?

Is there unexpected shoaling there since the wreck was 'reduced' a year or two back ?

Thanks.

Wednesday, 25 September 2013 - 22:13
 
Post 121
  Kevin Charles, Dover
Larger reefer tonnage is now calling at Dover which would account for interesting statistics from DHB last week that Dover Cargo Terminal handles 26% of UK banana market. Interesting thought when your next in the supermarket!

Wednesday, 25 September 2013 - 21:34
 
Post 120
  Kevin Charles, Dover
The season is certainly drawing to a close as the cruise ships head for warmer waters. Hope to see Carnival back soon although they are not operating in Northern Europe next year due to the high costs of air travel. They source passengers predominantly from the US.

The quieter winter months will see the roof on cruise terminal 1 replaced in a major 10 million contract.

Wednesday, 25 September 2013 - 20:45
 
Post 119
  howard mcsweeney, Dover
sorry to say that the mist did not clear colette, took this at 2. 45 pm.





Wednesday, 25 September 2013 - 19:00
 
Post 118
  ColetteB, Dover
The Carnival Legend is here today as scheduled, hopefully we will have some photos later when the mist clears as this is her final visit this season Smiley

Tomorrow we have the two Sagas in port, the Saga Ruby at CT2, T/R. as Kevin has already said this is her last visit to Dover before her retirement in December. The Saga Sapphire also returns to CT1. T/R. This is her last visit this season so it's the very last chance to photograph them both together.

Then on Sunday 29th September the Albatros returns to Dover at CT1 with a PoC for the last time this season. She was last here in August.

Monday brings the MV Empress back to Dover with a PoC at CT1, again for the last time this season. She was last here in May.

There are five cruise ships scheduled for October, the first one arrives on Tuesday October 1st in the shape of the AIDAmar at CT2, PoC. This is her first appearance this season, she was last here in September last year.

On Thursday October 3rd the Black Watch arrives, again for the first time this season for an embark only at CT1. She was last here in November last year.

Then on the following day Friday 4th, the Braemar is here again at CT1, T/R. No cruise ships then until she arrives back on Monday October14th, again at CT1, T/R.

A break then until Saturday 19th October when the Black Watch returns to CT1, T/R.

That's it for now until November 5th Smiley


Wednesday, 25 September 2013 - 12:18
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